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that, it will give what? give the energy to ping-pong ball and it itself will slow down. and so what do you do is you take these things and you bounce them off atoms like the size of carbon. did you ever hear about the heavy water? you bounce them off light atoms or molecules and these things will slow down, so they're moderated and will cause the reaction of more of this fission. you call--nuclear fission, gang, breaking apart, nuclear fission, and you will fission more atoms. anyway, this is something that cause an awful lot of excitement. because along with these two, it turns out the kinetic energy of these particles and these, all flying apart, is awesome. the energy that takes to light up new york city comes about as a result of water pouring over niagara falls. and every water drop has an energy of about this much, four electron volts. electron volts are tiny unit of energy. it's microscopic unit of energy, yeah? but four electron volts per water drop, tnt-- [makes sounds] --you get about 30 electron volts. high-octane gasoline, about 30 electron volts per molecule of combustion,
] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular error probable of the blast effects of nuclear weapons. here we are today, we have traveled a considerable difference. we have traveled a considerable distance. they didn't say al qaeda or iran or north korea, wh
clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead platinum building which is very few build
energy, the same co2 emission. the end of our planet is possible. but there is an enormous chance for us. what they need our products with lower energy consumption. what they need our energy efficient products. who could better develop this than the united states and the europeans, in cooperation together. to combine innovation on climate change with industry and production. that is possible, but only if we are live. therefore i am in favor of a trade agreement. asked what other obstacles there are. a lot of europeans doubting, but i saw better ground here in the united states, in ohio, and i saw for the first time in a swing state, the co2 question played a major role in the election concerning the coal mining question. to avoid any other misunderstanding, i know what it means to close a coal mine for 35,000 inhabitants, most of them employed in the coal mine. when you close down the coal mine, it was an economic disaster. but today, the coal mine is closed down and you have an economically flourishing city. so it is possible to step away from a traditional industrial structure, with pu
and energy environmental design, it takes a look at the way we think about the places where we live and work. i like to think of it as designed for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this
reduces the consumption of energy for heating and cooling by 51%. >> we have two destination elevators. destination elevator save 35 to 40% of the electrical energy over traditional elevator. these elevators save energy by using a regenerative drive. when the cars are going up empty or down full of people, they generate electricity that goes back into the building grid. these elevators have energy by grouping people going to the same floor in the same cab. and the way they work is you have a shared elevator call button in the lobby. you would indicate which floor you're going to, for instance like 3, and it will direct me to elevator c. so, i'll go to an elevator with people that are going to that same floor. what's also interesting is inside the elevator floor cab there are no selection buttons because i selected my floor in the lobby. this takes some getting used to as we're all accustomed to choosing our floor inside the elevator cabs. ♪ ♪ >> another thing we saut that was a challenge for this building was the permitting process for the delivery machine to use reclaimed water in
. this needed to be the best example of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilities headquarter project during the time when the project was at a stand still for a number of reasons, largely due to budget issues. and at the time we were asked to consider an alternative design using concrete rather than the scheme that was potentially planned for previous to that, which was a steel frame structure that used hydraulic dampers to control seismic motion. >> so, i met with my team. we worked hard. we came up with a great idea. let's take out the heavy steel structure, let's put in an innovative vertical post tension concrete structure, great idea. we did that. a lot of other things. and we came up with a price of 140 million. so, we achieved that goal. and, so, when we first started looking at the building, it was going to cost a lot of money. because of the way it was being built, we could only get 12 floors. we wanted more space for our employees. we ended up going and saying, okay, if we do a concrete building inste
we notice something -- which we have been doing we will write about t now, clean energy has to be discussed in the various facets that clean energy is produced. not only here in the united states but brazil and other areas and to find out really how much does that cost and finally let me say mr. chairman that we do have hydro electricity as part of this and we need to see how that is implemented. thank you very much. >> thank you. i have -- additional cards to name? jessica dur man ackerman and david mccord. >> hi. i am jessica ackerman and conservation staff with the sierra club and i am here to represent the 30,000 members in the bay area. i want to thank the supervisors for talking about the importance of this program and climate change and the importance of the program at for outreach. this is opportunity for economic growth but only if it includes local build out and we're seeing strong benefits and the installation of clean energy, energy efficiency, and leveraging other regional sources and we are concerned that the pln has a stagnant rate of power on the open ma
energy security, and then president obama marks 20 years that the united states and the soviet union reduced nuclear weapons. and then deductions that could be part of the negotiations over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> this weekend on c-span3's "american history tv," follow harry truman's eldest son, as they prepared to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb on 1945. >> i know everyone has their own view. i don't want to argue survival. i think we're past that. i want to do what i can to see that this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone.
. joining me with that side of the story is amy harder who is the energy and environmental reporter for the "national journal." she's coming to us from washington. and also in washington, david sheppardson, the d.c. bureau chief of the detroit news. welcome to you both inside "the war room." >> thanks, governor. >> thanks for having me. >> jennifer: amy let me start with you. the actual number of electric plug-in cars sold here as a percentage of the overall sales is very small. but talk about whether it is considered at least rapidly growing. >> i think it is all relative and it is growing. and it is growing substantially from where it was in say 2011 to where it is poised to be in 2012 after the next month when we see the final sales in december. it went from 2.23% in 2011, total car sales to right now it is at 3.3%. so it is going up. still a very small piece of the pie. i think that's what you need to remember that you need to keep this in perspective. one interesting dynamic is that a lot of the competition
of defense has invested significant time and resources into improving our nation's energy security. energy security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently
to -- >> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. we still continue to have a problem. the report we are releasing today and the subtitle says it all. harnessing american resources and innovation. how do we leverage this abundance we have in the united states to our maximum benefit? washington is talking about our fiscal crisis. the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis are close. it is unnecessary ingredients. every recession in modern times has been preceded by oil price hike. we can cut all we want and raise revenue, we will never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. how do we leverage this gre
? >> absolutely. what i have been struck in the debate is the time, energy, and attention that has been spent on these tax policies, and the neglect of the broader challenges we face. this is the fantasy of bill and donald that the entire world is focused on capping deductions and what the ramifications are and this is how they spend their lives, so they are in their element, but lee side of the broader goals here. as maya saying, the first question i wanted to answer, does this all the problem? we have a medium-term problem which is the 10-year window, we're going to borrow $10 to it unless we change our policies. then we have what we feel is a primary threat to the future, the long-term problem. before we get to the detail of what the percentage should be, we need to make sure that whenever we negotiate solves those problems. it is essential that brevity -- that revenue be part of the equation. it is difficult to do the spending cuts alone. you need to touch the budget by 30% over the long term, and that will not be supported by the people of all long haul. we cannot just worry about the de
the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that ch
and electron or light or something hits, makes electron go up, come back down, boom, off goes the energy in the form of light. the same thing happens when you excite the innermost electrons. if you excite those-- it takes a lot more energy-- and you're knocking electron way up and it comes way back down, boom, that light photon that emerges is beyond the range of seeing. it's even beyond the ultraviolet, and that's what x-rays turned out to be. simply high frequency light from the orbital electrons jumping orbits that correspond to great energies. but after that, it was found that there were radiations coming from different minerals that did not have to do with the electron orbiting around nucleus. it had to do with the nucleus itself. and the radiations that were emitted, to make a long story short, were three different types. now you might think they'd call them maybe "a," b, c, right? but these are physicists, gang. we didn't call them "a," b, c. you know what we called them? alpha, beta, gamma. that's "a," b, c in greek, yeah? so alpha, beta, gamma ray. and it turns out that those ra
the key to u.s. energy independence. a new study says absolutely not. is the controversial outlook right? we'll drill down on that one. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's take a look at the day's market headlines. stocks look exhausted after a week of fiscal cliff fueled volatility. the major indices swayed between positive and negative territory closing the day mixed. the dow eked out three points, three. while closing out the month of november down half a percent. >>> you know the global economy is in trouble when even taco bell and kfc have trouble making money, right? shares of their parent company yum! brands dove nearly 10% today. the company warned fourth quarter sales in china, their single best market, would likely slide. >>> u.s. consumer spending fell for the first time since may. the 0.2% decline in october partially being blamed on the impact of superstorm sandy. why not. >>> starting off tonight, taxes are the talk of the town and have been for daze. seems like much of the conversation is focused on the wealthy to get them to pay more.
, energy and the navy signed a memorandum of understanding to invest $170 million each to spur the production of advanced aviation and marine biofuels under the defense production act. this joint memorandum of understanding requires substantial cost sharing from private industry of at least a one-to-one match. the main objective of this memorandum of understanding is to spur the construction or retrofit of commercial scale advanced biofuel refineries. these facilities will produce drop-in advanced biofuels meeting military specifications. they will be located at geographically diverse locations for ready market access and will have no significant impact on the supply of agricultural commodities for the production of food. it's the largest single consumer of fuel in the world, the department of defense uses approximately 120 million barrels of oil each year, spending over $17 billion in fiscal year 2011 on fuel. this dependency on a single source of energy leaves our military's readiness at risk. when the price of oil goes up $1, it costs the navy an additional $30 million, and
prop 16 attack on the clean energy programs and community choice in california that it didn't matter that pg&e didn't use rate payer funds they were able to argue that entire $46 million plus campaign was funded by their stockholders, so they are going to run a multi-million dollar robust campaign in san francisco against this program, and it looks like their plan to roll out the 100% green project hits about the same time we roll this out at the end of 2013. i think that's the timeline for them, and it's very important to note that if we go forward prematurely with a marketing plan that is not based on good robust outreach to people of color, low income communities, people of different languag seniors and also based on the 10, 11-dollar premium w pg&e electric is offering $6 the consumer is not going to understand and yeah that is cheaper but ours is better and to the consumer that is coke and pepsi and coke is six bucks and we cost 11 bucks and coke is pg&e the customer is going to pick pg&e and that comes to what i wanted to highlight in this the information that local power has
to hire the energy commission. california became the leader in energy efficiency. we put in tax credits and policies of the public utilities commission to favor alternative energy, independent power production. which is obvious today. when they promoted code- generation it was something very novel. 30 years ago. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all
, not just around clean energy but employment and if we're successful in this program, and especially to the build out of the program that can happen when we have revenue coming in and many jobs can come with the build out and i am excited about that. there are neighbors in san francisco that are greatly impacted by unemployment, greatly impacted by marginalization and racism and inability to access the job market and this can lead the way that we have a strong implementation of programs and services to support communities that are in need of opportunity, so i'm very xietded about how we can move forward with this program, and i will actually cede the mic to the president of the commission. any opening remarks about today's -- >> i can't add more to that articulate overview and i support it and thank you to the commissioners that preceded me and the staff and the now general manager as well for their contributions during that process. thank you mr. chairman. >> thank you. today we will be discussing the customer notification and the education plan. i think it's the bulk of the wo
, and that is we have been asking ourselves a question, along the lines of energy use in the city, something that has been hard for us to figure out. and that has to do with what would inspire you, as someone who lives in the city, to give your data of your own energy use in the city, like your home energy use? all that data about when you use it, what are your hot times, your cool times. how about if we try to find some way to inspire people to give us that]h data, in some coordinated way. because if we understand that 20 to 22% of our emissions comes from1ar residenl use, you can imagine if we had that data coming from every household use in the city we could break that data down with involvement of creative people like yourselves, and then try o see where there's patterns where we could lessen our carbon footprint and talk about better energy use. that's perfect for us. that's what we're going to ask this challenge to present for our next improve sf challenge for the city. and that's what we'd like to engage people in. and then hopefully, some time after this challenge is announced, and
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
to the grid in california. a lot of these are renewable energy projects, but they all need to connect to the grid in a way that is safe for maintenance [speaker not understood] electricity to the citizens of california. some of these projects will potentially actually impact the city's transmission facilities from the central valley and if they're not mitigated can affect our ability to provide allowable electric service to our customers. this particular project is with north star solar. they're proposing to build the 60 megawatt solar generating facility. the cost of their piece of mitigating the potential effects of connections is currently estimated to be $2.9 million. that number may actually change because it is really an aggregate number for all the projects that may connect to the system and some of those projects may fall by the wayside as they go forward. we actually have not approved any specific mitigation projects yet and before they're undertaken of course the puc will be subject to the usual steps for planning, design, review and approval including environmental review,
of the main political parties debated the future of nuclear power in the country's energy mix. prime minister yoshihiko noda presented the position of the ruling democratic party. he pledged to aim for a shutdown of all nuclear plants by the end of the 2030s. >> translator: i believe that after last year's nuclear accident the public is determined to get rid of nuclear power and to shut down the plants. we need to promote realistic policies that respond to these expectations. >> one of noda's main opponents, liberal democratic party leader shinzo abe said nuclear power should not be a matter of black or white. >> translator: after experiencing such a severe nuclear accident, we've all decided that japan should depend on nuclear power as little as possible. but the ldp's position is not to simply say let's go nuclear-free. that's because we're a responsible party. >> abe said the real issue is how to secure enough electricity. he added it would be unreasonable to rely on renewable energy sources as they have yet to be fully developed. the leader of the newly formed tomorrow party, yukiko kada,
challenges. and it's challengin the best innovators in america to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number
of the main political parties debated the future of nuclear power and the country's energy mix. prime minister yoshihiko noda presented the position of the ruling democratic party. he pledged to aim for a shutdown of all nuclear plants by the end of the 2030s. >> translator: i believe that after last year's nuclear accident the public is determined to get rid of nuclear power and to shut down the plants. we need to promote realistic policies that respond to these expectations. >> one of noda's main opponents, liberal democratic party leader shinzo abe, said nuclear power should not be a matter of black or white. >> translator: after experiencing such a severe nuclear accident, we've all decided that japan should depend on nuclear power as little as possible. but the ldp's position is not to simply say let's go nuclear-free. that's because we're a responsible party. >> abe said the real issue is how to secure enough electricity. he added it would be unreasonable to rely on renewable energy sources as they have yet to be fully developed. the leader of the newly formed tomorrow party, yukiko kada
be a challenge for that. we observed that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe
in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has won smartest building in the world and we have honors such as the greenest city in north america, the walkable city, and the best green policies, the green tech of north america and forbes recognized that san francisco has the most green jobs in the united states. that's jobs. that's one of the most important things we are doing for the whole country. [applause] and we are creating and sustaining jobs as well as supporting new industries in our city. our energy watch program creates or su
energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers.
act with all that extra energy. with all that heat, it's energy. you see it manifested in hurricanes. that's one way that the earth transfers energy from one mass to the next. moving all that energy. moving weather is one way it happens. but the agriculture belts will start moving. the economic impact of this is massive. >> maybe that's when we'll wake up. >> we don't want to stop the rising ocean remember that? >> cenk: that's right. let me give you three more facts. to mark's point of what we need to do. let's skip head to b 13 b this is an interesting chart. see the top line we'll show you on the chart. that's where we need to go in order--no, that's not it. you know that's on the screen, i'll tell you about that. that's 3.2%. that's the amount of carbon in the atmosphere more this year than last year. it continues to increase and increase and increase. now you see that chart. >> there's your chart. >> cenk: okay, so now the red line is what we're doing right or what we plan to do to get climate change under control. the line at the very top is if we do nothing at all. this is the
that be. >> state lawmakers deciding how to dole out money to help schools become more energy efficient. if we have the latest on what is happening now that prop 39 is state law. >> we want to be first in line. somehow. some way. >>reporter: principal greg thomas pleading his case to law make investigators give his campus some of the state new energy retrofit money. 73 percent of california public schools are more than 25 years old and in need of the funding badly to upgrade or replace windows, inefficient lighting and old air conditioning heating systems fichlt we can look at energy efficiency then you are having savings year over year over year and then you will have more money visible for those things. >>reporter: the costs are staggering. more than 10,000 public schools in california together spend 700 million dollars a year on energy. that's how much they spend on all supplies. that's to voteers who aprove proposition 39 disadvantage schools will now be able to pay for energy retrofit. proposition 39 closes tax loop hole that mostly benefited out of state corporations. it'
in the market. you also have energy infrastructure, which is paying about 6%. most of it is a return of principle. these are companies with some of the lowest cost of capital ever. high return projects, long-term contracts. the government is in support of energy independence in this country, so we don't think the taxes change for mlps and energy infrastructure investments. finally, if you like high-yield corporate bonds, we love high-yield municipal bonds where we're getting 6% federally tax free. corporate high yield has rallied too much. we've sold it. >> rick santelli, should we be focusing on something else? this constant focus on the fiscal cliff, obviously, it's been dictating sentiment. it's been dictating markets. are there other areas that investors should be looking at? >> well, i had a guest this morning, dr. saunders, who's testified on issues regarding housing, fha, in front of congress. he knows what he's talking about. he brought up what many of us are looking at. a lot of -- you know, real estate, residential construction was one of the positives in today's gdp report
that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> gangdom style. (music). [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the cast of steve silver's beach blanket babylon. [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the san francisco 49ers -- >> [inaudible] >> woo. >> laughter. come on. the san francisco giants. [cheers and applause] that's better. the detroit tigers. and that can only happen in the greatest city in the world, san francisco! [cheers and applaus
reason. you cannot spend the energy of invention or creativity it. followed by the ipad and so on. people get caught by this. i mean, what can this do? a few years ago, and mobile telephone in a suitcase. today, in your pocket. carrying with them certain baggage of values. imperceptibly, they affect things. there is this culture. ways of thinking, you know? presenting it as an alternative. you do not have to throw away your ipod because you are a follower. you can be as materialistic as you what. being grounded in certain basic -- i do not want to say the turmoil. basic values. being selective about what you take from the exterior world. tavis: these questions are difficult because they are different in different parts of the continent. you are the perfect person to answer this question given your own history. being a political prisoner, etc., etc.. >> the very negative. very pessimistic. let's put it this way. is the continent progressive? no, it is not. there are pockets here and there. you find is one step forward, several steps back. as i said earlier, i never thought we would be so b
, the people, everything. it is like everyone has so much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is definitely a lot more fun than being inside. >> so far we have had zero problems. it is a long-step process, a lot of thinking and people involved. so we think that we got rid of all of the problems that could happen. they are doing it, and we are doing it and everybody is doing the best that they can. >> it is a wonderful out reach >> come. >> it is beautiful. ♪ >> hello, i am with the san francisco parks department serious we are featuring some wonderful locations in your and very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. we are here at the lovely and historic palace of fine arts, located in the bustling marina district. originally built for the 1950's exposition, the palace is situated along san francisco's waterfront. it is ada accessible and is reached by the 28, 30, and 91 bus lines. with its rotunda, columns, uncut the reflecting waters against the eucalyptus trees, it is one of the most romantic sett
try to avoid their mçó4+y?i nepink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. the holidays can be an especially difficult time. everything's different now. sometimes i feel all alone. christmas used to be my favorite. i just don't expect anything. what if santa can't find me? to help, sleep train is holding a secret santa toy drive. bring your gift to any sleep train, and help keep the spirit of the holidays alive. not everyone can be a foster parent, but anyone can help a foster child. >> ama: people dodged a bullet in sonoma county. the russian river did not overflow. it continues to rise. threat of flooding is something they live with. they received four to ten inches of rain. residents hop
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